03 Curfew

First.

Curfew 

Middle english. [Anglo-French coeverfu, old French cuevrefeu (modern couvrefeu), from tonic stem of couvrir cover + feu fire.]

1.

a. A regulation by which, at a fixed hour in the evening, a bell was rung, as a signal that fires were to be extinguished; also, the hour of ringing, and the bell. (The statement that curfew was introduced to England by William the Conqueror as a measure of political repression is without early historical support.)

b. Hence, the practice of ringing an evening (and morning) bell, in many towns.

2.

A cover for a fire; a fire plate.

Also attributively in combination curfew-bell (see sense 1).

Also in figurative use

1. ‘Well, ‘tis nine o’clock, ‘tis time to ring curfew.’ Romeo and Juliet IV. iv. 4.

Second.

Curfew

Middle English.

1.

A regulation by which, at a fixed hour in the evening, a bell is rung, as a signal that lights are to be extinguished; also, the hour of ringing, and the bell.

2.

A cover for a fire; a fire plate.

Also attributively in combination curfew-bell (see sense 1).

Also in figurative use

1. ‘Well, ‘tis nine o’clock, ‘tis time to ring curfew.’ Romeo and Juliet IV. iv. 4.

Third.

Curfew

1.

A regulation made to protect the public. At fixed hours a bell is rung as a signal that people must stay indoors; Also the hour of ringing, and the bell. At these times the hounds are released into the streets to catch terrorists and criminals.

2.

A cover for a fire; a fire plate.

Also attributively in combination curfew-bell (see sense 1).

Fourth.

Curfew

Middle english. [Anglo-French coeverfu, old French cuevrefeu (modern couvrefeu), from tonic stem of couvrir cover + feu fire.]

1.

A regulation made during the political repression. At fixed hours a bell was rung as a signal that people should stay indoors; Also the hour of ringing, and the bell At these times the hounds would be released into the streets. The government at the time said that this was “to catch terrorists and criminals.”

2.

a. A regulation by which, at a fixed hour in the evening, a bell was rung, as a signal that fires were to be extinguished; also, the hour of ringing, and the bell.

b. Hence, the pre-repression practice of ringing an evening (and morning) bell, in many towns.

3.

A cover for a fire; a fire plate.

Also attributively in combination curfew-bell (see sense 1).

Also in figurative use

1. ‘Well, it’s nine o’clock, and time to ring curfew.’ Robert and Julia IV. iv. 4.

Fifth.

Curfew

Middle english. [Anglo-French coeverfu, old French cuevrefeu (modern couvrefeu), from tonic stem of couvrir cover + feu fire.]

1.

A regulation by which, at a fixed hour in the evening, a bell was rung, as a signal that people should stay indoors; also, the hour of ringing, and the bell.

2.

a. A regulation by which, at a fixed hour in the evening, a bell was rung, as a signal that fires were to be extinguished; also, the hour of ringing, and the bell.

b. Hence, the former practice of ringing an evening (and morning) bell, in many towns.

3.

A cover for a fire; a fire plate.

Also attributively in combination curfew-bell (see sense 1).

Also in figurative use

1. ‘Well, it’s nine o’clock, and time to ring curfew.’ Robert and Julia IV. iv. 4.

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